The Body-Mind Disconnect: a cultural perspective

Comments Off on The Body-Mind Disconnect: a cultural perspective Written on March 10th, 2021 by
Categories: General

Before we define “body-mind connection”; how did we lose it in the first place? We think of our bodies as these vehicles we drive around in. We decorate them, we want people to admire them, and they are a reflection of us. But when they break down, we get pissed off, drag them to the mechanic to get fixed or at least quieted down until one day… the wheels fly off. Some of us drive them into the ground with zero maintenance, some never take them out of the garage, and some people do regular maintenance. But very few people actually consider their bodies as more than this nuisance to be dealt with (hopefully by someone else).

what our bodies feel like!

    So how did we get here? To this separation of our physical selves? Some people blame technology, but let’s back it up. In almost every religion, from sects in India to mainstream Christianity, the body is seen as a distraction or an impediment to obtaining a higher spiritual plane. It’s the other, whose annoying needs drag us down to this earthly plane. In fact, if you could beat up your own body, put it in pain, deny it food, sex, or sleep, you were really getting somewhere (ascetically speaking). Whether dragging a giant cross down a highway on your bloody knees, or never sitting or lying down for any reason for 40 years (as the standing babas did); more physical self-abuse equaled more holiness. 

    Intellectuals weren’t much better. The body to them was base, a mortal coil to finally be shuffled off. The pursuits of the mind was where it’s at. Of course, there were the hedonists and those that “celebrated” the body. But in truth, they only celebrated pleasure and the current culture of beauty, not the body itself. Pleasure is fine but often doesn’t actually involve connecting to one’s body. 

   Today, this leaves us in a place where people don’t trust or listen to their own bodies or even know what that would involve.

Through this avenue, I’d like to widen the scope, to first define what listening to one’s body looks like and then how to treat one’s body more like the living breathing animal rather than an object. And this doesn’t have to involve food journaling or necessarily yoga. This understanding opens up potential for personal growth and physical well-being that most of us barely realize is there. 

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